How the Internet Helps Keep E-Tabs On You

August 6, 2014
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A whole bunch of happy jackasses of my general acquaintance were in their element on Facebook, ecstatic that an already convicted sex offender was arrested in Houston, Texas on Sunday August 3, 2014, after “Google flagged images of child abuse found in his gmail account” and contacted authorities to authorities, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Nothing is wrong with this, per sé, but it certainly clarifies the manner in which the search engine giant is scanning and silently exploring each and every one of us for any number of our email activities.

“Very good,” you may say. “I’d like to string them up by their balls. I love kids and we’ve got to punish the perpetrators of kiddie porn because they’re evil.”

I really don’t know how they do their job. But I’m just glad they do it,” Detective David Nettles of the Houston Metro Internet Crimes Against Children Taskforce said. “He was keeping it inside of his email. I can’t see that information, I can’t see that photo, but Google can. He was trying to get around getting caught, he was trying to keep it inside his email.”

How the NSC Keeps E-Tabs On You

Now in no way am I condoning kiddie porn, but I would also ask if you are aware that most of the tot smut that’s freely available in countries like Morocco, Albania, Turkey and especially Qatar features preteen boys and is an ever-expanding industry. Having visited all these countries save Qatar, I can verify that this is true. In a world where open immigration laws, especially for professionals, have opened the long closed doors of the forbidden, the bird has already flown! Busting consumers is all well and good, yet none of the authorities in question anywhere in Europe or North America have the will to go after the perpetrators. Why?

At the same time, here’s a question. Have you heard of ECHELON? It is a global network computer system for the interception of private and commercial communications, according to Cracked. Scary thought? Well, not really, that’s what the Internet is, after all. At the same time as all those small time Pedo Papas are trolling, the big guys – out of Albania, I’m told – are encrypting their stuff and the authorities play cat-and-mouse games of their own in games that resemble the work of World War II code breakers. We know for sure that one side is bad, but what about the cabal between big government and big business that monitors your every email, your phone records, and web surfing information? All of it to theoretically catch kiddie pornistas, terrorists, hackers and any number of criminal masterminds.

You may say, what has this got to do with me punishing my monkey or the fetishes I enjoy sharing with my lover or spouse? Well, the team of geniuses who don’t go after the actual pornographers are using them as bait. Diabolically thinking up ECHELON is bad enough. Now consider that every kind of electronics you own comes with a secret, hidden microscopic code. A code the police can trace to you! Formed by the NATO allies after World War II, it analyzes three billion messages per day and is, according to USA Today,The largest signals intelligence and analysis network for intercepting electronic communications in history.”

Google’s board of directors and its mighty P.R. machine have long repeated the mantra that they will never reveal technical information to third parties, yet we know that Google’s automatic image search works by comparing ‘hashes’ of images once the files in question have been identified. A hash is a unique code created by running an image through a simple algorithm. The hash of each file is then compared to a database of hashes produced by known images of child abuse. Working in this way protects Google from maintaining a large database of illegal images themselves, which would be legally problematic to share with third parties.

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